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Sellersville, PA 18960
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Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)

Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) also commonly known as spastic colon, or “nervous” bowel is a malfunction of the intestinal tract often occurs when a person is in their teens or young adulthood. Although this syndrome can affect the entire intestinal tract, it usually occurs when the colon fails to contract properly. Normally the muscles of the colon constantly work in unison to propel waste material out of the body, but in a patient with irritable bowel syndrome the muscles contract in a disorganized manner. At times, parts of the colon can be contracting in a painfully-exaggerated way, while other parts of the colon can be “asleep.” This can cause fits of diarrhea, followed by constipation, and bouts of embarrassingly excessive gas. Although irritable bowel syndrome tends to run in families, it is not a disease. Although there may be contributing factors, the syndrome is caused by the interaction between the nervous system and the intestinal systems. The syndrome usually flairs up when a person is under stress.

  • Diagnosis: Irritable bowel syndrome is made by reviewing a patients medical history, and performing tests to check the health of the colon.
  • Treatment: Although the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome can be severe, there is no disease present in the digestive tract and the condition is not serious. Since the syndrome flairs up when a person is under stress, many patients feel better knowing that there is nothing seriously wrong with them. A healthy diet, exercise and reducing stress in a patient's life can keep the syndrome under control.